News Archive

Date:
24 Apr 2015
The Pf3k Consortium has made its third public data release, the first to include data on all samples in the pilot phase of the project. Consisting of sample information, analysis BAMs and preliminary baseline genotypes for 2,512 samples collected from major malaria-endemic regions in Africa and Asia, this represents one of the largest collections of open access Plasmodium falciparum genomes in... More »
Date:
24 Mar 2015
Today, we published the first issue of the MalariaGEN newsletter, which we hope will be a useful means of sharing our progress and scientific achievements. The first issue includes information on large data releases in all three malaria genomes—human, parasite and mosquito—including an important internal data release to Consortial Project 1 partners. Our programme coordinator, Christa Henrichs... More »
Date:
23 Feb 2015
Dr Alfred Amambua-Ngwa is a Career Development Fellow with the MRC Unit in The Gambia, whose research focuses on malaria population genomics with a particular interest in determining genome-wide signatures of selection for markers of immunity and drug resistance in Plasmodium falciparum. A long-time MalariaGEN collaborator, Alfred has been studying malaria for ten years. On a recent trip to Mali... More »
Date:
20 Jan 2015
Study identifies complex genetic architecture behind drug resistance, providing a reminder of how crucial surveillance and elimination programmes are The largest genome-wide association study (GWAS) to date of the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum unveils a complex genetic architecture that enables the parasite to develop resistance to our most effective antimalarial drug, artemisinin. The... More »
Date:
18 Dec 2014
A study of the way malaria parasites behave when they live in human red blood cells has revealed that they can rapidly change the proteins on the surface of their host cells during the course of a single infection in order to hide from the immune system. These findings provide deep insights into the stage of the parasite lifecycle that is responsible for causing severe illness, and could explain... More »
Date:
11 Dec 2014
The first major data set from the Anopheles gambiae 1000 Genomes (Ag1000G) project has been released, comprised of whole genome sequence data on 765 mosquitoes collected from 8 countries spanning sub-Saharan Africa. This release from phase 1 of the project offers an unprecedented view of genetic differences within and between mosquito populations, in locations where malaria remains a public... More »
Date:
12 Nov 2014
The Plasmodium Diversity Network Africa (PDNA) has published an analysis of genetic variation in 1,212 P. falciparum samples collected from across 12 African countries. The findings, published in the Journal of Infectious Diseases, provide important baseline information about the prevalence of mutations in the K13 propeller domain in sub-Saharan Africa. The K13 propeller domain was identified in... More »
Date:
28 Sep 2014
In a paper just published in Nature Genetics, the MalariaGEN Consortium reports a major study that set out to replicate the many findings of genetic associations with severe malaria that have been reported in the literature. "In malaria it’s often not possible to replicate findings, because of heterogeneity in host and parasite populations," says Professor Dominic Kwiatkowski of the University of... More »
Date:
12 Sep 2014
Scientists are poised to capture data that will help support efforts to track and respond to the drug-resistant malaria parasites in Africa. The Plasmodium Diversity Network Africa (PDNA) has been established across eleven countries in sub-Saharan Africa and will help to ensure that scientists are able to work together and perform effective and timely surveillance for the genetic markers of... More »
Date:
31 Jul 2014
Drug-resistant malaria parasites have spread to critical border regions of South-east Asia, seriously threatening global malaria control and elimination programmes, according to a study published in the 'New England Journal of Medicine'. The study confirms that resistance to the world’s most effective antimalarial drug, artemisinin, is now widespread in South-east Asia. This is not the first or... More »

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